User Generated Education

Education as it should be – passion-based.

Design a Cardboard Chair Challenge

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In Learning in the Making: How to Plan, Execute, and Assess Powerful Makerspace Lessons, I discuss a Framework for Implementing Maker Experiences as depicted in the following diagram.

I recently asked my 9th grade students to do a cardboard chair challenge. What follows is how the students went through this framework.

Framing or Frontloading the Experience

Framing or frontloading a maker education experience increases the chances that transferable skills and knowledge result, is framing or frontloading the activities as part of introducing them.

This activity was framed as a continuation of the team building and group communication activities in which the students participated the previous week. They were told that they needed to practice the effective communication skills they identified during the previous activities.

The Experience

The experience is, obviously, the doing or making part of the framework. Below is a cardboard chair challenge guide I found from Creativity Lab and which was shared with students via Google Classroom.

Materials

Designs Created in Tinkercad

In their small groups, they created their chair designs using Tinkercad.

Chair Construction

In their teams, students built their cardboard chairs using the Zip Snip Cutting Tool and the Makedo screws to connect the cardboard pieces (worked wonderfully I want to add).

Reflecting on the Experience

To reflect on their maker experiences, student work groups were given a set of cards (see below) to, first, pick cards from the deck to verbally answer, and to, second, choose three of the cards to answer in a blog post.

Example Verbal Responses to the Reflection Questions

Reflection Card Blog Post Examples

The Conceptualization: Researching

Finally, students were asked to create a infographics

Example Student Infographics


Written by Jackie Gerstein, Ed.D.

September 18, 2019 at 11:51 pm

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